Posts Tagged ‘ Wireless Electricity ’

Buy a piece of the future at Sharaf DG : Power Mats

[tweetmeme] Sharaf DG in Dubai is one of my favorite stores, offering a lot of electronics gadgets and offers at the same time. Personally, my experience is of a kid going to a candy store. I always find something noteworthy and something of utter uselessness when I go there, however it might not stock the latest Google Nexus One or Samsung Droid, it still sports something that grabs my attention.

My pick at my last visit was the Power Mat, well you have heard about normal mats, but this will help your gadgets charge and juice up wirelessly, yes you hears that right wirelessly. We’ve seen quite a few induction-based “wireless power” systems make the scene, and while the idea is interesting both in theory and prototype, actually getting it to market has proven to be quite difficult, with some casualties along the way.  Unlike other induction-based “wireless power” contraptions, this one came out earlier this year as total vaporware and has now resurfaced as a collaborative effort by Michigan-based HoMedics Powermat North America (HPNA).

It seems as though Powermat is a shoe-in to the first company to really hit with something usable, affordable and practical. When you need to give something with a USB port a bit of juice, you can simply plug it into the PowerMat and let it transfer power across. It’s nice and neat, and a simple concept. Of course, it tackles the question of wireless charging, that charges devices without them needing to be attached, but it’s no less interesting for it.

I would have got one except that they do not really support Nokia devices and my N95 would not really make use of it, but really when they support it, I would be more than happy to get it. Priced at about Dhs 300, it is something that will drop price as the sales increase.

Checkit out here:

http://www.powermat.com/us/home/
http://www.sharafdg.com/shop/index.aspx

Advertisements

Nokia charging phone with thin air …

[tweetmeme] We all have had Nokia Phones at some time, and we always have loved them for their robust nature along with their ease of use. A lot of people mention that with the new technologies in the world, Nokia has sort of lost its relevance. I think on the other hand Nokia is looking at different markets than the giant that it has become, iPhone and the Phone that aspires to be the Giant, the Motorola Droid, or the Google Nexus One.

As long as technology is moving on, so is the need for more juice in the batteries of the phones. More requirement for the power means that there will be more advancements required in batteries; or charging for the batteries. What if you dont really have to charge them at all, I mean physically. Ofcourse there are ways, like kinetic energy transformation, solar energy etc. But here’s another concept; Like Nokia I have always been wondering about how much energy is in the air all around us, I am not talking about the energy of people; but more to do with energy of wireless radio systems. Be it FM transmitting radio, GSM signals, Wi-Fi Signals or terrestrial radio systems. What if we could tap into that power to enable mobile phones to pick up the charging of the batteries from there. Completely wireless, and completely practical.

I guess what needs to be worked out is how long it will take to tap this power and how long can you charge the phone with this. Well Nokia is at it again, their innovation well not really aimed at high end phones but mostly innovation like these. Nokia Research center is working on a solution that will help the cause of wireless charging.

Nokia

A new prototype charging system from the company is able to power itself on nothing more than ambient radiowaves – the weak TV, radio and mobile phone signals that permanently surround us. The power harvested is small but it is almost enough to power a mobile in standby mode indefinitely without ever needing to plug it into the mains, according to one of the researchers who developed the device at the Nokia Research Centre in Cambridge, UK. The concept is being worked upon by different fronts, old crystal radio sets and more recently modern radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, increasingly used in shipping and as antitheft devices, are powered purely by radiowaves.

The difference with Nokia’s prototype is that instead of harvesting tiny amounts of power (a few microwatts) from dedicated transmitters, Nokia claims it is able to scavenge relatively large amounts of power — around a thousand times as much — from signals coming from miles away. Individually the energy available in each of these signals is miniscule. But by harvesting radiowaves across a wide range of frequencies it all adds up. Such wireless transfer of energy was first demonstrated by Nikola Tesla in 1893, who was so taken with the idea he attempted to build an intercontinental transmission tower to send power wirelessly across the Atlantic. Nokia’s device is somewhat less ambitious and is made possible thanks to a wide-band antenna and two very simple circuits. The antenna and the receiver circuit are designed to pick up a wide range of frequencies — from 500 megahertz to 10 gigahertz — and convert the electromagnetic waves into an electrical current, while the second circuit is designed to feed this current to the battery to recharge it.

Wireless charging is not intended as a sole energy source, but rather to be used in conjunction with other energy harvesting technologies, such as handset casings embedded with solar cell materials. According to Technology Review magazine, the phone could be on the market in three to five years.

In the meantime, there are other companies who are working on similar concepts  for charging devices wirelessly using the ambient radio waves. At CES 2010, RCA introduced something even better that’s going to be available way sooner: a dongle that tops up your mobile device’s battery via WiFi signals. Notice I didn’t say that it only tops up your cell phone battery; according to RCA reps, this little fella will work with just about all of your mobile devices.

The attachment is efficient enough that it actually provides a noticeable boost to your battery, and given enough time it will charge it to the max. Other similar gizmos have provided only a weak top-up charge at best, so this is a huge improvement. And what’s even better is that the device will be available for around $40 in the summer of 2010. Soon, as long as you’re in an urban environment or around a WiFi router, worrying about your phone’s charge will be the last thing on your mind.

The future applications of the technology are exciting as well. In 2011, RCA expects to release batteries with the WiFi charging capability built right in. There’s no word yet on how much those will cost, but does it matter? The prospect of never having to plug your phone in again will probably be enough to have them flying off of the shelves. Video Included.

Via source and source

One ring to rule them all … Wireless Electricity

The future of devices and the future of technology is something that you would see a lot of on this blog. So I am certain that you would ask what is that one technology that might change the future for the good. I have written about it before and had highlighted Power Generation as that one technology.

Today well I will add to it, and say Power Generation and Power Transmission. Why transmission, Well Wireless Electricity is here. What I saw today is a revolutionary innovation in technology front. I must say it will change the course of future for human race. Its called WiTricity. As the name suggest, its Wireless Electricity. WiTricity Power is about ransferring electric energy or power over distance without wires. The new system exploits simple physics principles and can be used to charge a range of electronic devices over several meters. One of the first devices to implement this technology is the Palm Pre and its touchstone charger. It still implements charging with touch. But in the future as the technology spills into mainstream devices we will see more interesting implementation.  Here is their presentation at TED.

It has been more than 100 years since this technology was initially discovered. Researchers attribute the delay to develop the technology to limitations of well-known physical laws and a simple lack of need. Only recently have modern consumers obtained a high number of portable electronic devices which currently require batteries and plug-in chargers. Pioneered by the principles of one of the greatest Modern Minds in Physics Nicola Tesla. Can you imagine where we would use these things ??

Consumer Electronics

  • Automatic wireless charging of mobile electronics (phones, laptops, game controllers, etc.) in home, car, office, Wi-Fi hotspots … while devices are in use and mobile.
  • Direct wireless powering of stationary devices (flat screen TV’s, digital picture frames, home theater accessories, wireless loud speakers, etc.) … eliminating expensive custom wiring, unsightly cables and “wall-wart” power supplies.
  • Direct wireless powering of desktop PC peripherals: wireless mouse, keyboard, printer, speakers, display, etc… eliminating disposable batteries and awkward cabling.

Industrial

  • Wireless power and communication interconnections across rotating and moving “joints” (robots, packaging machinery, assembly machinery, machine tools) … eliminating costly and failure-prone wiring.
  • Wireless power and communication interconnections at points of use in harsh environments (drilling, mining, underwater, etc.) … where it is impractical or impossible to run wires.
  • Wireless power for wireless sensors and actuators, eliminating the need for expensive power wiring or battery replacement and disposal.
  • Automatic wireless charging for mobile robots, automatic guided vehicles, cordless tools and instruments…eliminating complex docking mechanisms, and labor intensive manual recharging and battery replacement.

Transportation

  • Wireless charging for existing electric vehicle classes: golf carts, industrial vehicles.
  • Wireless charging for future hybrid and all-electric passenger and commercial vehicles, at home, in parking garages, at fleet depots, and at remote kiosks.
  • Wireless power interconnections to replace costly vehicle wiring harnesses and slip rings.

Some Other Applications

  • Wireless power interconnections and automatic wireless charging for implantable medical devices (ventricular assist devices, pacemaker, defibrilator, etc.).
  • Wireless charging and for high tech military systems (battery powered mobile devices, covert sensors, unmanned mobile robots and aircraft, etc.).
  • Wireless powering and automatic wireless charging of smart cards.
  • Wireless powering and automatic wireless charging of consumer appliances, mobile robots, etc.

Coupled with another technology

Scientists at the Imperial College London’s Department of Aeronautics say they have created a plastic that can store and release electricity, revolutionising the way we use phones and drive cars. It means the cases of mobiles and iPods could soon double up as their power source — leading to gadgets as thin as credit cards. The technology could also lead to flexible computer screens that can be folded up and carried around. The material is not really a battery, but a super capacitor — similar to those found in typical electrical circuits. Even the car of the future could be drawing power from its roof or the door, thanks to the new material.

Now that is a place I want to live in, Really looking forward to the plastic storing electricity and wirelessly charging itself . Beam me up Scotty 😉