Posts Tagged ‘ Mobile ’

Nokia imagines technology in 2015

[tweetmeme] What does the future look like? Gadgets without keyboards, touchscreen devices, and phones that feature augmented reality, GPS, web browsing, and more. See for yourself in the video below.

Although clearly just concepts at this point, the devices shown in the animated video paint a picture of how we’ll be using devices and services. Connecting to TV, so we can share TV watching experiences with people on the other side of the world, or even using the mobile device as a projector. Contextual awareness plays a big part too, with the device working together with the cloud, both pulling information down to the device, and also sending information back.

Take the fisherman in India. Not only is he using his device to get the best prices for his fish, but he’s making extra money by selling his data to overseas universities who can tap into his and other fishermen’s information for their research.

It might not be a single device either. We saw an example of the user who’s main device is his mobile computer, acts as a satnav and a multimedia centre – much as our devices do today. However Mr 2015 also has a smaller, sub device which he can use for sport. With the same interface as his main device, and the addition of the cloud, means he can move seamlessly between the two.

Of course, this is all still conceptual, but we can see easily how the services and strategy being laid down today form the backbone of the lives we’ll be living tomorrow.

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Nokia again with Self Charging Phones

[tweetmeme] A few days back I wrote about Nokia Research center working on a prototype technology that would allow cell phones to charge using the radio airwaves that so many radio  transmitters like wifi, radio and GSM use.

Nokia is a genuine game player when it comes to modernizing mobile communication. When just everything is being designed to run on alternative form of energy, it’s fitting that even the mobile phones are set on route. For this, the cellphone maker has filed a US patent application for a phone that can work continuously without requiring to be plugged into a wall socket for a recharge.

The patent is for a self charging phone, which would harvest energy from its owner’s motion. This will be possible courtesy built-in piezoelectric generators that would be placed to help generate electricity from kinetic energy. The phone will have all the heavier components, such as the radio transmitter circuit and battery, supported on a sturdy frame. The frame will be able to move along two sets of rails. Piezoelectric crystals sit on the end of each rail and generate a current whenever the cellphone is moved. So as the user walks, or otherwise moves the phone, electricity is generated to recharge the onboard battery.

A lot of people actually are these days talking about how Nokia is loosing its grip on the cellphone market and the high end innovation is no longer coming from Nokia. However, with technologies like these there seems to be a ray of hope for Nokia to walk back into the hearts of the skeptics. The fact that the iPhone and other high end phones still cost more than they do in the United States in most of the world will definitely give Nokia the time they need. What do you think ?

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Nokia charging phone with thin air …

[tweetmeme] We all have had Nokia Phones at some time, and we always have loved them for their robust nature along with their ease of use. A lot of people mention that with the new technologies in the world, Nokia has sort of lost its relevance. I think on the other hand Nokia is looking at different markets than the giant that it has become, iPhone and the Phone that aspires to be the Giant, the Motorola Droid, or the Google Nexus One.

As long as technology is moving on, so is the need for more juice in the batteries of the phones. More requirement for the power means that there will be more advancements required in batteries; or charging for the batteries. What if you dont really have to charge them at all, I mean physically. Ofcourse there are ways, like kinetic energy transformation, solar energy etc. But here’s another concept; Like Nokia I have always been wondering about how much energy is in the air all around us, I am not talking about the energy of people; but more to do with energy of wireless radio systems. Be it FM transmitting radio, GSM signals, Wi-Fi Signals or terrestrial radio systems. What if we could tap into that power to enable mobile phones to pick up the charging of the batteries from there. Completely wireless, and completely practical.

I guess what needs to be worked out is how long it will take to tap this power and how long can you charge the phone with this. Well Nokia is at it again, their innovation well not really aimed at high end phones but mostly innovation like these. Nokia Research center is working on a solution that will help the cause of wireless charging.

Nokia

A new prototype charging system from the company is able to power itself on nothing more than ambient radiowaves – the weak TV, radio and mobile phone signals that permanently surround us. The power harvested is small but it is almost enough to power a mobile in standby mode indefinitely without ever needing to plug it into the mains, according to one of the researchers who developed the device at the Nokia Research Centre in Cambridge, UK. The concept is being worked upon by different fronts, old crystal radio sets and more recently modern radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, increasingly used in shipping and as antitheft devices, are powered purely by radiowaves.

The difference with Nokia’s prototype is that instead of harvesting tiny amounts of power (a few microwatts) from dedicated transmitters, Nokia claims it is able to scavenge relatively large amounts of power — around a thousand times as much — from signals coming from miles away. Individually the energy available in each of these signals is miniscule. But by harvesting radiowaves across a wide range of frequencies it all adds up. Such wireless transfer of energy was first demonstrated by Nikola Tesla in 1893, who was so taken with the idea he attempted to build an intercontinental transmission tower to send power wirelessly across the Atlantic. Nokia’s device is somewhat less ambitious and is made possible thanks to a wide-band antenna and two very simple circuits. The antenna and the receiver circuit are designed to pick up a wide range of frequencies — from 500 megahertz to 10 gigahertz — and convert the electromagnetic waves into an electrical current, while the second circuit is designed to feed this current to the battery to recharge it.

Wireless charging is not intended as a sole energy source, but rather to be used in conjunction with other energy harvesting technologies, such as handset casings embedded with solar cell materials. According to Technology Review magazine, the phone could be on the market in three to five years.

In the meantime, there are other companies who are working on similar concepts  for charging devices wirelessly using the ambient radio waves. At CES 2010, RCA introduced something even better that’s going to be available way sooner: a dongle that tops up your mobile device’s battery via WiFi signals. Notice I didn’t say that it only tops up your cell phone battery; according to RCA reps, this little fella will work with just about all of your mobile devices.

The attachment is efficient enough that it actually provides a noticeable boost to your battery, and given enough time it will charge it to the max. Other similar gizmos have provided only a weak top-up charge at best, so this is a huge improvement. And what’s even better is that the device will be available for around $40 in the summer of 2010. Soon, as long as you’re in an urban environment or around a WiFi router, worrying about your phone’s charge will be the last thing on your mind.

The future applications of the technology are exciting as well. In 2011, RCA expects to release batteries with the WiFi charging capability built right in. There’s no word yet on how much those will cost, but does it matter? The prospect of never having to plug your phone in again will probably be enough to have them flying off of the shelves. Video Included.

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How Many Germs are on your Mobile Phone

Currently, there are 1,258,320 germs living on your cell phone

That’s the equivalent of 252 toilet seats!

I got this really ridiculous number from The Oatmeal after taking a funny stupid test. Get yours here.

Now your face is your Business Card

[tweetmeme] Interestingly, I wrote about the Augmented Reality Business Card a few days back talking about how Augmented Reality is getting into business cards in ways that makes them more interesting and really awesome. Check out the previous post on the same here. Well now, Polarrose has come up with a solution where one’s face can be used now as a Social Business Card along with TAT (The Astonishing Tribe).

The concept video from Polar Rose on You tube has received over 400,000 views so far as the “Augmented ID” combines Augmented Reality and with Face Recognition, to deliver the worlds first AR application that recognizes people seen by the mobile phone’s camera in realtime and displays icons around their heads with direct links to the person’s profiles on sites such as Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Slideshare and others.

The technology is breakthrough because it will help designers now look to more than just the ugly black marks (sort of ugly) to pull up Augmented Information, if it can work with faces (Which are quite complex) they can be used with normal shapes such as brand logos, objects etc.

The first biggest step since the introduction of the Augmented Reality technological previews.