Posts Tagged ‘ How To ’

How to Download movies from the Internet using BitTorrents

A Beginners Guide

I have been asked a few times, how people are downloading movies from the Internet, People with nearly no technical skills want to but don’t really know how to download movies. Before I can do a how to on this one I definitely need to mention that I quite frankly do not support downloading illegal content from the Internet. You have to be careful when downloading torrents as many of them are copyrighted and illegal. Now that that is out of the way, lets see how we can download a movie from the internet. For this How To I am going to use a website that hosts free public domain movies like http://www.publicdomaintorrents.com/ which do not carry copyright infringement in doing so.

Step 1 : Get yourself a Bit Torrent ‘client’

Bit Torrent is a process where you can share files with many people called lechers, through a process known as peer to peer networking. Peer to peer is actually a form of networking where unlike accessing google.com or yahoo.com where you request information from the Google server, you would request this information from a private user connected to the internet elsewhere in the world. Since this is different from just plain ‘browsing’ you would need a specialist software to actually connect with many peers or seeders. Unlike browsing where you use Internet Explorer, Firefox or Google Chrome which are browsers, what you would need is a Bit Torrent ‘client’ software. There are possibly hundreds of free Bit Torrent Clients out there, but the most popular among these are Vuse, uTorrent and BitTorrent. The process that you would use for downloading would be more or less similar regardless of what client you use. I would however suggest using uTorrent as it is not only the most popular but also the best of the lot according to me. To download uTorrent, Go to uTorrent.com and click on the big Free download button to get the Bit Torrent client. Once it is downloaded you could follow the procedure to install the software on your computer, it’s pretty straight forward to do so. Now you are ready for step 2.

Step 2 : Get the torrent file

Once you have the Torrent Client installed on your computer, you will then need to tell the client what file you want to download and from where. For this very purpose seeders or people who share for information on the internet, create a file with extension .torrent. Just like your word or excel files have an extension .doc or .xls and open in Microsoft Word or Microsoft Excel, the .torrent file opens up in your Bit Torrent client when you open it. There are many hundreds of torrent sites on the internet and most of these offer various downloads like music, movies, documentaries, books, games and even software. You could search for your choice of downloads on these sites and obtain the .torrent file. This is usually marked with, “download torrent here” or “Download this Torrent”. Examples of sites which provide torrents are http://www.thepiratebay.org, http://www.mininova.org, http://www.demonoid.com and then there are other websites that act as torrent search engines that actually bring together the torents from various torrent sites online, these might be http://www.torrentfreak.com, http://www.cinematorrents.com/ and others.

Step 3 : Open the .torrent file in your client and wait

Once you have downloaded the .torrent file from the site that you want, Usually, the web browser’s file download manager will ask what to do with this file. You want to open the file with your torrent client. If it doesn’t open that way, just save the .torrent file to an easy to locate place. Then open your torrent client and use the “Open Torrent” feature(Most torrent clients support click & drag). Now you can let your Bit torrent Client do the work for you while you can go away and do something else on your computer or kill time, because torrents do not require your attention and will download in the background. How long a torrent takes to complete the download is completely dependent on how fast is your internet speed, How many people are sharing the file (seeds) and how big the file that you are trying to download is. Usually movies are about 700 MB – 1.37 GB and this would mean that it would take about 8 hours of download on a 512KB connection with a few hundred seeds.

Tips and Warnings

· You can close your torrent program and turn off your computer when you need to. Most torrent programs will resume download process automatically when you start them back up. If the download doesn’t resume automatically, there should be an option to start downloading, by either right clicking on the file and choose “Start” or a button somewhere in the program.

· There are other torrent clients (programs) that can be used so do your research on these also. The most popular torrent programs are uTorrent, Azureus and BitTorrent.

  • There are Torrent search engines that search the popular torrent clients (programs). This saves you time by not having to search each individual torrent client site. The most popular torrent search engines are TorrentReactor.net, Nowtorrents.com and Qtorrents.com .
  • When looking for torrent files, try to find ones with plenty of Seeders. When searching for torrents, you can often sort the results by seeds, simply by clicking on the seeds column header.
  • Seeders (Seeds): Are people who have a complete copy of the torrent’s files and are only uploading (sending) data to the people who are downloading (peers).
  • Leechers (Peers): Are people who have a portion of the torrent’s files while they are downloading they are actively uploading to help others download more quickly.
  • Downloading torrents can slow your computer down depending on how well your computer performs. Recommended specs for each client vary, but on average you should have at least 512 MB of RAM and a 1 GHz CPU. You will also need space for the files you want to save.
  • In certain jurisdictions it is illegal to download content through peer to peer networks such as bittorrent. There is a program which blocks certain IP addresses from communicating with your computer and can help protect you while downloading. PeerGuardian can be found at:phoenixlabs.org/pg2or [1]
  • Keep your anti-virus program and its definitions fully up-to-date, downloaded software from ‘sharing’ sources carries a high risk of infection.
  • Downloading torrents can slow your overall internet connection down if you don’t properly tweak your upload rate. DSL and Cable modems have problems downloading if you’re uploading at your maximum rate. Set your clients maximum rate to 80% of your maximum upload rate if you can adjust it. If you set your upload rate too low, your downloads will slow to a crawl.
  • It’s important to know about bittorrents so that you know the risks, consequences, and best practices.
  • Make sure you check the comment section before downloading, if there is one, to see if the torrent is real or not.

All I can say now is Happy Downloading .

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Become an Internet Ninja ……. swoosh

[tweetmeme] Whether we’re working or just browsing, we spend a lot of time on the Internet every day. Be it searching for something on Google, walling people on Facebook or maybe even farming on Farmville, we have been sort of addicted to the internet. Well you want to graduate from being just a web user to an internet ninja. So, well the first step is to definitely get rid of your age old, Internet Explorer. Its not that I hate IE, but yes I hate IE. I would highly recommend Firefox or Google Chrome as your best friend when it comes to browsers. My current favorite being Google Chrome.

OK, so you’ve already ditched Internet Explorer and switched to Firefox or Google Chrome. But are you using your browser’s best features? Power Web surfers or Internet Ninjas know the settings and shortcuts that make getting what you need online fast and efficiently. Here are five browser tricks that can streamline your surfing session, whether you’re on Facebook or the company intranet.

1. You can have multiple tabs as your Startup Page

The days of a single default home page are over. If you always get on the Web to check the same Web sites like Gmail, Facebook, Google Reader and this blog 😉 save yourself the time of visiting them by hand, and set all of them to load automatically in tabs when you start your browser. To set this up using Firefox, open only the tabs you want to load when you start, and from the Tools menu, choose Options. Under Startup, in the Home page setting, click the “Use Current Pages” button to set those tabs as your home tabs. In Chrome’s Options you can do the same.

2. Restore the last tabs and windows you had open automatically

Instead of loading a static set of tabs that don’t change when you start your browser, automatically load what you were looking at when you quit your browser last time. In Firefox’s Options dialog (get to it from the Tools menu), next to “When Firefox starts,” choose “Show my windows and tabs from last time” to restore your previous browsing session. In Chrome’s options, on the Basics tab, select “Reopen the pages that were open last.”

3. Undo your accidentally closed tab.

You accidentally closed a tab that you didn’t mean to? No problem. Just like the Ctrl+T keyboard shortcut opens a new tab, the Ctrl+Shift+T shortcut reopens the last tab that you closed. So when you think you just killed that fantastic article you had open meaning to read it all day, press Ctrl+Shif+T to get it back. Repeat that same shortcut to continue re-opening tabs you closed down your history list. (This shortcut works in both Firefox and Chrome)

4. Open a link in a background tab by clicking your mouse wheel.

When you’re browsing this or other blogs, news, Twitter, or Facebook you come across links you want to check out, but you don’t want to stop reading your current page. If your mouse has a wheel on it, click links of interest with the mouse wheel to open links in background tabs as you read down a page, so you can switch to them later without interrupting your flow now. An extra tip for mousewheelers: Close background tabs in one click of the mousewheel without switching to them first, too.

5. Sync your bookmarks across browsers and computers.

When you save a bookmark at work you want it in your list at home and vice versa, and bookmark synchronization is available in both Firefox (with an extension) and Chrome. If you’re a dedicated Chrome user, bookmark syncing comes built in, from Chrome’s Tools menu, choose “Synchronize my bookmarks.” Sign into your Google account, and Chrome will save your bookmarks into a Chrome folder in your Google Docs account. You can then access all your bookmarks from anywhere.

Now over to GMail

All these tricks should enable you to slowly be an Internet Ninja, now its time to look at GMail. If you don’t have a Google Account or are living under a rock, GMail is Google’s Mail program and the Google ID is your key to unlock all of Google’s Products. Anyway, Google has launched power tips for the Ninja in you to be able to master all the tricks in GMail.

Starting from a White belt to being a Gmail Master, the Gmail tips site gives you all you need to check out for being awesome at using the Program. Check out these tricks and let me know how far with have you come.

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