What if tattoos were changeable … ???

I mentioned how I am finding it difficult to decide on a tattoo, and in my quest to find a great design had led to dead ends so far. However, the quest is still on.

One of the biggest fears is the fact that, we need to know what it looks like, I mean it might look good on paper but in reality it might not really look that good. So well we can turn to technology then, I mean its there to make our lives easier. Fortunately, computer graphics artist Loic Zimmermann has developed a program that will allow users to get a look at what a complex design might look like on a 3D figure. If this technology catches on, the possibilities for pushing the art form are obvious. What if you can check on the tattoo and what it would look like before trying it on ? Well here is the answer to that question.

The biggest fear in getting a tattoo is the it might sound like a good idea at that time, but then later it might not really represent you as a person. Technology is the way to go, Phillips the guys who gave us nearly every consumer electronics device (prototypes at least) have a solution to this as well. A prototype of the Skin : Tattoo from Phillips is here. Check out the video below.

Philips Design examined the growing trend of extreme body adornment like tattoos, piercing, implants and scarring. The Electronics Tattoo film expresses the visual power of sensitive technology applied to the human body. The film subtly leads the viewer through the simultaneous emotional and aesthetic transformations between two lovers. Check out the Phillips Design Webpage here.

Another solution is detailed at New Scientist, here is the article below :

If you are planning to express your undying love for someone with a tattoo, you might want to wait a little while before going under the needle. New inks that are safer to use, and far easier to remove should you have a change of heart, are set to be launched next year.

The US Food and Drug Administration has no standards for the safety of dyes used in body art. Carbon black, metal salts and other compounds more commonly used in printing or car paint are among those used. Heavy metals and other toxic chemicals in these pigments can seep into the lymph system, says Martin Schmieg, president of the company Freedom-2 in Philadelphia, which is planning to introduce a range of dyes that have already been approved by the FDA for use in cosmetics, food, drugs and medical devices.

Such dyes have not been used in tattoos before as they are readily absorbed by the body. To get round this problem, Rox Anderson at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston has developed a way to encapsulate the dyes in protective polymer beads just 1 to 3 micrometres in diameter. This is small enough to allow them to be injected into the skin and absorbed by skin cells to form a tattoo.

The pigment can be removed with a single laser treatment. This splits the beads open, dumping the dye into cells where it is absorbed. The tattoo then quickly fades away, in stark contrast to standard tattoo pigments. Applying a series of up to 10 laser treatments can usually bleach them, but only half of tattoos can be completely removed.

Check out the article in New Scientist here.

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  1. March 2nd, 2010

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